Lehmus Roastery Lauritsala—an amazing mélange of flavors

During the past week, I’ve been having some really amazing coffee. After I finished my bag of Sammonlahti from Lehmus Roastery, I opened this: Lauritsala from the same company.

Lauritsala is a blend of Monsooned Malabar, S-795/Kent Arabica natural from India, and wet hulled Tim-Tim/Caturra Arabica from Sumatra, Indonesia. The roast level is 4/5, and is called ”French Roast.” Lehmus describes this as a pretty full-flavored blend at 4,5/5.

Let’s get this straight: I liked it very much.

At first, however, this blend really made me think. The bag aroma was pleasant, and yet it took me several days to put my finger on what it was reminding me of.

On the label it was suggested that Lauritsala would be especially suitable for filter and French press. So I tried it in my new drip coffee maker. The result was perfectly OK: a cup of high quality, dark roasted Arabica coffee. However, I still couldn’t quite figure out what this blend was about. After that I brewed it in my AeroPress (one of the inverted methods), with the same result. (Lately, I have not been a big fan of French press coffee, so I decided to leave that contraption on the shelf.)

After a little hesitation, I decided to put the blend into my trusty Bialetti moka pot, with a finer grind size. It was like a light bulb went on. Suddenly all the different aromas and flavors appeared.

Just. Amazing.

Picture yourself standing in the beginning of a beautiful forest path in mid-September. After the rain, you can smell wood, roots, turning leaves, some delicious mushrooms. Next, try to imagine mixing all that with a generous helping of molasses.

Quite a mélange of aromas and flavors.

In this sense, Lauritsala was not unlike Sammonlahti: there were several savory elements to it, and then also the sweeter, molasses-like aspect. In this blend, though, the rootiness was more prominent than the molasses. The mouthfeel was very similar in both blends: creamy and smooth, with no harshness at all.

What more can I say? Just like its darker sibling, Lauritsala is an extremely high quality blend, only more complex.

Get it from Lehmus Roastery. You owe it to yourself.

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Lehmus Roastery Sammonlahti—dark, creamy and excellent

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One of my good colleagues hooked me up with this: Sammonlahti from Lehmus Roastery. 

Lehmus is a roastery located in the city of Lappeenranta, southeastern Finland. They have received many awards, such as ”The best roastery in Finland” in 2017 and 2018.

According to the label, Sammonlahti is an espresso blend of washed Robusta from Uganda, and wet hulled Tim-Tim/Caturra Arabica from Sumatra, Indonesia. The roast level is 5/5, and is called ”Italian roast.” The company also describes this as a full-flavored blend at 5/5.

As I opened the bag, I was a little surprised. Unlike many real Italian espresso blends, the beans were really dark and oily, and made me think of some Starbucks products. However, the bag aroma wasn’t like Starbucks at all. It reminded me of pine needles, or the traditional Finnish Christmas tree. Interesting!

I brewed this in my trusty old Bialetti Moka pot. The bouquet was very nice: like a dark, strong arabica/robusta blend mixed with some pine needles.

In my opinion, the body or mouthfeel was medium full. I just loved this part. It felt so creamy and smooth, syrupy, even.

What about the taste, then? This was a big, strong and powerful blend with many savory flavors, such as tar and pine needles. The tar was actually very prominent, but not to the point where the flavor reminded you of creosote (which I like a lot in a coffee, by the way). On the other hand, there were some sweeter elements to this blend as well: molasses, even a small hint of dark chocolate. These two aspects, the savoriness and sweetness were in perfect balance. The tar/pine thing stayed in the forefront, but was balanced out nicely by the molasses-like feel.

Nowadays, I usually don’t reach for really dark roasted coffee as much as I used to. That’s why I was surprised how much I liked this blend. Yes, it was super dark, but not harsh or bitter at all. Instead, it was full bodied, creamy, smooth, and very flavorful. I highly recommend you try Sammonlahti from Lehmus Roastery. It is truly an excellent product.